How can technology work together

“When you’re part of a community, you want to leave it better than you found it,” says Keertan Kini, an MEng student in the Department of Electrical Engineering, or Course 6. That philosophy has guided Kini throughout his years at MIT, as he works to improve policy both inside and out of MIT.

As a member of the Undergraduate Student Advisory Group, former chair of the Course 6 Underground Guide Committee, member of the Internet Policy Research Initiative (IPRI), and of the Advanced Network Architecture group, Kini’s research focus has been in finding ways that technology and policy can work together. As Kini puts it, “there can be unintended consequences when you don’t have technology makers who are talking to policymakers and you don’t have policymakers talking to technologists.” His goal is to allow them to talk to each other.

At 14, Kini first started to get interested in politics. He volunteered for President Obama’s 2008 campaign, making calls and putting up posters. “That was the point I became civically engaged,” says Kini. After that, he was campaigning for a ballot initiative to raise more funding for his high school, and he hasn’t stopped being interested in public policy since.

High school was also where Kini became interested in computer science. He took a computer science class in high school on the recommendation of his sister, and in his senior year, he started watching computer science lectures on MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) by Hal Abelson, a professor in MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

“That lecture reframed what computer science was. I loved it,” Kini recalls. “The professor said ‘it’s not about computers, and it’s not about science’. It might be an art or engineering, but it’s not science, because what we’re working with are idealized components, and ultimately the power of what we can actually achieve with them is not based so much on physical limitations so much as the limitations of the mind.”

In part thanks to Abelson’s OCW lectures, Kini came to MIT to study electrical engineering and computer science. Kini is currently pursuing an MEng in electrical engineering and computer science, a fifth-year master’s program following his undergraduate studies in electrical engineering and computer science.

Combining two disciplines

Kini set his policy interest to the side his freshman year, until he took 6.805J (Foundations of Information Policy), with Abelson, the same professor who inspired Kini to study computer science. After taking Abelson’s course, Kini joined him and Daniel Weitzner, a principal research scientist in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, in putting together a big data and privacy workshop for the White House in the wake of the Edward Snowden leak of classified information from the National Security Agency. Four years later, Kini is now a teaching assistant for 6.805J.